lucky charms - the New Year's lucky charms in Greece -thedelphiguide.com

Human cultures around the world have traditional symbols considered to bring good luck, prosperity and protection from negative energies. A talisman (from French talisman, via the Arabic word tilsam (plural tilsaman) which comes from ancient Greek telesma (τέλεσμα) – meaning «completion, religious rite, payment», ultimately from the verb teleo (τελέω), meaning «I complete, perform a rite») is often shrouded in mystery and closely associated with religion.

In modern Greek the word gouri (from the Latin augurium = good omen) has two meanings: good luck and good luck charm. Gouria, the plural, are traditionally Greek New Year’s gift. According to Greek superstitions, a good luck charm cannot be bought but rather given as a gift from someone.

This is why the gouri is a symbolic gift exchanged between family members, friends, or business associates, wishing the recipient good luck in the New Year. Typically gouria include the year they were presented to the recipient.

Gouria are centered around certain charms that have come to represent the New Year. The most popular charms are:

pomegrenate - the New Year's lucky charms in Greece -thedelphiguide.com

the Pomegranate symbol of fertility and abundance. The custom of breaking pomegranates inside of a new home for good luck dates back to ancient Greece. Today, many people break a pomegranate to start the year off on a positive note.

onion - the New Year's lucky charms in Greece -thedelphiguide.com

the Onion is the most resilient of roots, surviving in most weather conditions. As a result, it has come to represent vitality.

the evil eye - the New Year's lucky charms in Greece -thedelphiguide.com

the Evil Eye – The «mati» is another popular symbol. Many Greeks believe that by wearing or displaying a mati, which comes in the form of blue eye charms or blue beads, bad intentions can be reflected away.

coin - the New Year's lucky charms in Greece -thedelphiguide.com

the Coin is another symbolic piece of luck.  One of the classic Greek traditions is baking a small coin inside of a vasilopita, a cake made and cut for the New Year. The person who receives the piece with the coin inside is said to have luck for the year.

model boat - the New Year's lucky charms in Greece -thedelphiguide.com

the Boat – In Greece, a country with a rich maritime history and culture, the boat has come to symbolize many positive things in life including hope and good travels.

Even if you don’t necessarily believe in good luck, fate, or magical amulets , you have to admit — pinning a «mati» to your shirt can affect your attitude and can be a lot of fun than carrying a boring old rabbit’s foot or a cuddly pig!

https://thedelphiguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/luckycharms-featured.jpghttps://thedelphiguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/luckycharms-featured-150x67.jpgThe EditorCulture of Greecegouri,gouria,lucky charms,New Year's lucky charmsHuman cultures around the world have traditional symbols considered to bring good luck, prosperity and protection from negative energies. A talisman (from French talisman, via the Arabic word tilsam (plural tilsaman) which comes from ancient Greek telesma (τέλεσμα) - meaning «completion, religious rite, payment», ultimately from the verb teleo (τελέω),...your guide for Delphi, the "Navel of the Earth"