The School of Athens - Aristotle, Callisthenes and Delphi - thedelphiguide.com

Plato (left) and Aristotle in Raphael’s 1509 fresco, The School of Athens. Aristotle holds his Nicomachean Ethics and gestures to the earth, representing his view in immanent realism, whilst Plato gestures to the heavens, indicating his Theory of Forms, and holds his Timaeus. (pic from wikimedia)

Aristotle, the 4th c. BC philosopher, along with his nephew Callisthenes, visited Delphi, submitting to a call of the Amphictyony, the political organization / coalition of Tribes that sheltered the Sanctuary.

The archives of the Delphic Sanctuary (that included the catalogue of the winners in Pythian Games, the second in importance –to the Olympic Games- athletic / musical competition games in the Antiquity) were consumed by fire, so there was a need to re-create them.

In fact, there was a need to have scientists of the highest rank, true researchers, who could combine various informations and present them as a whole, since the lost archives were among the most important ones in the Ancient World (enlisting the prognoses / guidances of Pythia to the leaders of the Greek Mediterranean Colonization).

We can imagine the two philosophers working until late night, to the candle light, restoring History itself… What a sight that would be!


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https://thedelphiguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/The_School_of_Athens_by_Raffaello_Sanzio_da_Urbino-773x600.jpghttps://thedelphiguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/The_School_of_Athens_by_Raffaello_Sanzio_da_Urbino-150x116.jpgThe Editordelphic miscellaniesAmphictyony,Aristotle,Callisthenes,catalogue of the winners in Pythian Games,pythian gamesPlato (left) and Aristotle in Raphael's 1509 fresco, The School of Athens. Aristotle holds his Nicomachean Ethics and gestures to the earth, representing his view in immanent realism, whilst Plato gestures to the heavens, indicating his Theory of Forms, and holds his Timaeus. (pic from wikimedia) Aristotle, the 4th c....your guide for Delphi, the "Navel of the Earth"